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Before my doctoral program – which required me to narrow down to a specialty (sugar addiction) – I had studied food intolerances.

Many books on the subject start with food reactions, then move into chemicals in our homes and offices, gasoline fumes, and more. Important as those things are, they’re not about nutrition.

My interest in food intolerances has always been their link with addiction.

Recently, I “attended” a webinar by J.J. Virgin, whose first book (I believe) was on food intolerances and how to eliminate those foods to improve health and lose weight. The webinar re-sparked my interest in food intolerance and addiction.

Common triggers for food intolerance include chocolate, corn, soy, wheat (or other gluten-containing foods), peanuts, dairy, eggs, sugars and other sweeteners. russian store

What Does Food Intolerance Look Like?

Signs and symptoms can include headache/migraine, joint pains, fatigue, sleepiness, heart palpitations, depression, irritability, stomach pains, bloating, and many more.

Because digested food moves through the bloodstream, the effects of an intolerance can show up virtually anywhere in the body.

Food reactions might be the same every time the food is eaten, such as a rash.

Or the reactions might vary – say, a non-itchy rash one time and itching with no rash another time.

The reaction might be cumulative. Maybe a small portion of the food causes no reaction, but a portion eaten again that day, or several days in a row, does causes one.

Addiction is another possible reaction that may develop over time.

What Causes Food Intolerances?

The causes are many, but let’s keep it simple.

One cause is a genetic intolerance or a tendency toward it.

We can become intolerant to a food we eat often or in large quantities. Overeating a food uses up enzymes specific to digesting that food, so complete digestion is prevented.

Post Author: Worldhide

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